Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars Accidental Project Manager, July 7, 2010
By
Preston J Clark (Los Angeles, CA United States) – See all my reviews
This review is from: Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach with Student CD (The Mcgraw-Hill/Irwin Series Operations and Decision Sciences) (Hardcover)

I’m a lawyer turned businessman. As I’ve discovered, project management is synonymous with managing a business. EVERYTHING is a project. So I’ve been doing lots of project management reading. Lots of great materials out there but perhaps none as practical as this one (I admit to not having read every one– though I must be getting close). Authors Brown and Hyer have offered an accessible guide for managing projects of all types. The books shows how to ask the right questions at the front end, clearly define the project, involve the team in planning, and apply just enough of the technical tools to suit the situation. I especially like the way they combined traditional methods, team-based tools, and leadership dimensions of project work – no other book seems to do this so effectively. Definitely a valuable addition to my executive library. I keep it close.

5.0 out of 5 stars WOW! Excellent book, April 10, 2010
By
Own One (Edmonds WA) -
This review is from: Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach with Student CD (The Mcgraw-Hill/Irwin Series Operations and Decision Sciences) (Hardcover)

Two wishes; that all academics would use this book in their project management classes, and that all project managers would read this book. If you only read one book on project management it should be this one. It starts and ends with the real life appreciation that while there may be a project “manager” that in reality project management is a team effort, formal or informal. All the elements of project management are here and the textbook type presentation is ideal for the person new to project management or the seasoned manager wondering what went wrong, or right, on their current project. The book is, cover to cover, filled with wise advice and observation. “Many people who are starting out with software tend to believe it will manage a project for them.”, “ask stressed and busy project contributors for percent complete estimates, and you might wind up with a team mutiny”, “the student syndrome is the tendency for project team members to delay the start of their work until the last minute”, and “laboratory research has found that when group size exceeds five, decision quality deteriorates”. None of this is off-the-cuff advice. All is backed up with extensive footnotes and convenient chapter-end bibliographies that make it easy to delve deeper into any topic. A nice thing about this book that makes it almost unique in its field is that it is written in a very easy to read style and despite being comprehensive it is short, only about 300 pages. For people who came to project management through operations research classes, as I did, this gives you the 90% of “how to do it” you missed. For those who came to project management because they were discovered to be good at getting projects done despite the odds this is the formal background you are missing. All project managers new, experienced, and wannabies should have this on their desk as a primary reference.
As an aside one of the authors also wrote an equally good book on cellular manufacturing, Reorganizing the Factory: Competing through Cellular Manufacturing.

5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Project Management Guide, August 24, 2010
This review is from: Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach with Student CD (The Mcgraw-Hill/Irwin Series Operations and Decision Sciences) (Hardcover)

This is the best and most current book on Project Management I have seen. As a project manager for many years, a certified Project Management Professional and a professor at a major engineering college, I have been frustrated that the “current” textbooks had nothing new to say. While the standard textbooks (Kerzner, Meridith & Mantel, et.al.) all cover fundamental topics in Project Management, this book actually tells you how to use modern tools and techniques to rally a team and complete a project successfully. This book explains the theory behind a concept and then shows you how to actually implement the concept and check to make sure you got the results you desired. The approach, the case studies and homework exercise were fresh and effective and this text should appeal to audiences of all ages.

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